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Tang Wing Chi
Junior Member
Username: Tangwc

Post Number: 8
Registered: 07-2004
Posted on Saturday, August 14, 2004 - 03:44 am:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Trust in squad mates, unity, true friends and ability to persevere till the end. I feel very proud when wearing the full uniform and doing first aid for someone you don't know.
It does feel good to know that even though you do badly in studies, you are still talented with footdrill or first aid.
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sarah clarke
New member
Username: Brigadesrocks

Post Number: 1
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, December 27, 2004 - 05:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

more advance skills in first aid
able to help people with more confidece
.
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Jim Brown
New member
Username: Medic5494

Post Number: 1
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Saturday, January 01, 2005 - 07:43 am:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

We are new to the Youth Program, here in Petitcodiac New Brunswick Canada. I am interested in any ideas to help make our new Youth Program a success. We are a small community located in the Southeastern part of New Brunswick, with lots of support from our community.

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Deanna Toxopeus
New member
Username: Ubalstecha

Post Number: 1
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Saturday, January 01, 2005 - 08:44 am:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

After over 20 years in the youth program, both as a youth, then officer, and now PSO (in Federal), my advice is as follows:

Build your program based on what your youth members want to do as much as possible. Give them a choice of proficiencies, outings, social activities. Give them an opportunity to be invested in the division and have ownership.

Give them as much opportunity for leadership as well. Have them take responsibility for organizing part of a meeting, have them run the social events, operate the tuck shop at break, run a game or craft session for the juniors, or let them help plan an outing.

And finally, have as much fun as possible, both the kids and you. It really makes a difference. And it helps build the relationships that keep kids in this organization long past the time when learning first aid is their primary focus. (Experience talking here.)
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Jim Brown
New member
Username: Medic5494

Post Number: 2
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Sunday, January 02, 2005 - 03:51 am:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks Deanna. Permitting the cadets to evolve their own program to suit their needs is a great idea. SJA has done away with the militaristic approach here in New Brunswick. Therefore, promoting a cadet in rank is out. Perhaps a managerial approach would suit better. You have sparked an idea that just might work, thanks.
We could start a project that would select their manager. This would be determined by the one who wanted to succeed the most. We could try a recruitment project that would benefit the cadets,the Program and the community.
My motto is "if you can't have fun at work" and I believe that you can apply that in just about anything you try to do. I do appreciate your advice and plan to benefit from your experience thanks again. Jim
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Marika Beaumont
Intermediate Member
Username: Marika_beaumont

Post Number: 17
Registered: 08-2003
Posted on Sunday, January 02, 2005 - 10:36 am:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I agree with what Deanna has said with a few additions. Keeping the training active with more focus on skills and build in the theory in interesting ways, including games such as Jeopardy or Pictionary with some members setting the questions helps too. And camps! They are a great way to build teamwork and friendships within a division and between divisions (including any adults you may recruit to help out) They also help to build leadership skills in kids who may not shine at a meeting but will in the different environment. Keep asking, there's lots of experience and folks who love to share :-) Marika
mbeaumont@look.ca
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Justin Baumgardner
New member
Username: Justin622

Post Number: 4
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, February 14, 2005 - 06:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Training is the key issue with gaining confidence. I have been involved with SJA for a long time and I have received extensive training within the organization.. I love to share with my cadets the training that I have and hope that they some day will do the same.

As some people know that I am very enthusiastic and love to help people, and that is my main goal within SJA.
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Jim Brown
New member
Username: Medic5494

Post Number: 4
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Tuesday, February 15, 2005 - 04:06 am:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks Justin for your comments. I agree that training will gain confidence. This is already a staple part of our program. I am looking for additional ideas to keep our Cadets interested and to hopefully attract more to join.
I am an Instructor with SJA, a Paramedic Lab Instructor at the Atlantic Paramedic Academy and a practising Paramedic-2 in New Brunswick. Therefore training will always be a priority with our Cadet program. We have also started event coverage with supervision at some local events. This permitted some practical exposure Cadets and the public responded very well to the Cadets involvement. There were some injuries during the event (hockey tournament) and the Cadets participated in conjunction with our adult Brigade members, attending to the various minor injuries. Our goal is to have the Cadets respond on their own without supervision. This was the first time they had to make use of their training. Our Brigade is very active providing event coverage and the Cadets will play a significant role in the upcoming events. Some of these events will be: hockey and other sporting events, various types of horse shows, stock car races, various collisium event coverages, and our biggest event of the year is the National Motocross Race event coverage. This event always has a wide variety of injuries to deal with from very minor to major life threats. This event has 2 Paramedic staffed ambulances on site for the entire event in addition to the Mobile First Aid Post. Usually we have 2 First Aid tents around the track and teams of First-Aiders spread out around the track with portable radios. This year the Cadets will have a role participating in this event. This brings me back to training and the importance of our training. We train year round for the various types of injuries we see at these various event coverages and especially for the motocross event.
Perhaps you can share some of the types activities you enjoy througout the year. This might be helpful in coming up with new ideas with our group. Thanks again for taking the time to share your comments. I look forward to anything else you can offer. Jim
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Alex Kroeze
Senior Member
Username: Akroeze

Post Number: 227
Registered: 07-2003
Posted on Tuesday, February 15, 2005 - 01:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I would reconsider having the youth respond on their own. If for nothing other than legal reasons...
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Marika Beaumont
Intermediate Member
Username: Marika_beaumont

Post Number: 20
Registered: 08-2003
Posted on Tuesday, February 15, 2005 - 01:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

In Ontario our youth are not allowed to do unsupervised patient care until the age of 18 and with the new Advanced Medical Responder course or their BTS (until the end of the year). Is that different out there? We volunteer at a wide variety of events from hockey and figure skating and other sports events to parades, spring fairs, town fairs. Most are similar to what you do.
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Jim Brown
New member
Username: Medic5494

Post Number: 5
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Wednesday, February 16, 2005 - 04:32 am:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

As stipulated the Cadets are supervised and will remain supervised as per regulations. The event coverages contracted for are with the adult Brigade. The adults will have to be at these events and will be supervising the Cadets. The Cadets will be along for the experience and exposure. Sorry for any misunderstanding my comments may have caused.
Yes our coverages also include fairs, parades and the like. Thanks for your interest in our program. Jim

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